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Papaya Wear Women's Retro High Waist Braided Fringe Top Bikini Swimwear Plus Size Women's Retro High Waist Braided Fringe Top Bikini Swimwear Plus Size. Available in this size:L/XL/XXL/XXXL. L:(a) Top
4
$11.99 USD

Women's Retro High Waist Braided Fringe Top Bikini Swimwear Plus Size. Available in this size:L/XL/XXL/XXXL. L:(a) Top waistband Across : 12 inches (b) Hip Area where leg is exposed : 15.5 inches (c) Top piece, Across : 14.5 inches. (All measurements are across). XL:(a) Top waistband Across : 12.5 inches (b) Hip Area where leg is exposed : 16.5 inches (c) Top piece, Across : 14.9 inches. (All measurements are across). XXL:(a) Top waistband Across : 12.7 inches (b) Hip Area where leg is exposed : 18 inches (c) Top piece, Across : 16 inches. (All measurements are across). XXXL:(a) Top waistband Across : 13 inches (b) Hip Area where leg is exposed : 18.5 inches (c) Top piece, Across : 16.5 inches. (All measurements are across). Two style in different color for this item.Style 1 do not have back closure.Style 2 have back closure. Style 1 Colors:Black/Blue/White/Deep Blue/Pink/Light Pink/Light Green/Rose. Style 2 Colors:Flower/Camo/Wave/Green Flower/Zebra/Leopard. Two Piece High Waist Braided Fringe Bikini Swimwear made of Polyester and Spandex,strong and durable enough to resist damage. The Two Piece Fringe Bikini Plus size come with Halter Top and under-wire which provide great support. Retro fringe design,more fashion.This is a must-have Two Piece Bikini. To keep our swimsuits in the best looking condition, we advise to wash them by hand or use delicate setting in a washing machine. Note: Due to difference Computer Monitors,the color maybe slightly different from picture.Kindly understand that Package Includes: 1 x Bikini set(top & bottom)

2016
in clothing & accessories
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Women's One Piece Solid Ruched Push Up Tummy Control Halter Swimdress Swimsuits Women's Halter Push Up Solid Tummy Control One Piece Swimdress Skirted Swimsuits one piece swimdress Item specifics:
6
$26.99 USD

Women's Halter Push Up Solid Tummy Control One Piece Swimdress Skirted Swimsuits one piece swimdress Item specifics: Gender:Women Item Type:One Piece Bathing Suit/One Piece Swimsuits Brand Name:Upopby Style: Sexy,Fashion,Casual Support Type: this skirted swimsuit has underwire with padded Material: Polyester&Nylon Asian Size : M/L/XL Weight: 120g (approx) Quantity: one piece halter swimdress Features: 100% new and good quality It is rather comfortable and fashionable, sexy one piece swimdress. Charming & stylish Swimwear fits most girls or women A great gift for your lover or yourself. package Included: 1* one piece swimdress for women

2016
in clothing & accessories
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Krud Kutter PWC01 Purple Multi-Purpose Pressure Washer Concentrate with Sweet Odor, 1 Gallon Size:Value not found Ready to use, commercial strength formula is recommended for all exterior siding (wood, vinyl, aluminum),
6
$11.12 USD

Size:Value not found Ready to use, commercial strength formula is recommended for all exterior siding (wood, vinyl, aluminum), roofing of all types (asphalt shingles, fiberglass shingles, cedar til), gutters, stucco, brick and cement block, masonry, concrete driveways, walkways and walls, porch screens, pool areas, engines and equipment, even RV’s, patio furniture and boats. No scrubbing, simply apply to the surface, leave for 3 to 5 minutes, and wash off. Contains anti-corrosive agents to safeguard pressure washer parts (bleach can erode o-rings). Penetrates and helps remove tough stains from dirt, oil, grease, bird droppings, tree sap, mold and mildew. Directions for use: when using a pressure washer to clean painted surfaces, please be aware that water pressure alone may remove paint, or highlight existing discoloration caused by the sun’s uv. From the garden hose, rinse any nearby plants. Always test on an inconspicuous area first. Overspray can be neutralized with large volumes of water. For heavy oil and grease stains (such as on driveways and garge floors), pour product directly onto the stain. Allow to penetrate for 10 minutes, then follow normal application procedures. In case of severe oil and grease stains on porous surfaces, oil may bleed to the surface or leave a residual stain. Repeat applications may lighten stains, but not remove stains completely. Do not mix this product with any other chemicals. Contains: a proprietary blend of biodegradable surfactants, detergents, and emulsifiers, in a water-based solution. No petroleum solvents, bleach or ammonia. Caution: this product contains alkaline detergents. Eye and skin irritant. Do not take internally. First aid: in case of contact with eyes or skin, flush with water for 15 minutes. If irritation persists, seek medical attention. If swallowed, take large amounts of water. Do not induce vomiting. Get medical attention. Keep out of reach of children. Sweet odor. Container size: 1 gallon.

2016
in pantry, household & pets
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Anni Coco Women's Halter Polka Dots 1950s Vintage Swing Tea Dress
7
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Kingsport Festival Board Game This time, you are the bad guys. Why settle for the lesser evil? In the unimaginable darkness of Kingsport, silent wanderers are
4
$30.49 USD

This time, you are the bad guys. Why settle for the lesser evil? In the unimaginable darkness of Kingsport, silent wanderers are called to a profane celebration. Their goal: to invoke unthinkable horrors! A dread terror that is not of this world or any other - but rather from the spaces between the stars - demands your submission. Meanwhile, unwary investigators vainly attempt to halt this appalling chapter in the dark history of Arkham. As the high priest of one of these shadowy cults, you must dominate the city. You will invoke cosmic creatures and unholy gods to receive their "gifts", but you must take care to preserve your sanity and thwart the investigators who seek to stop you.

2016
in toys & games
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RELLECIGA Women's Stripe Twist Bandeau Bikini with Removable Halter Strap, L, Black and White Stripe RELLECIGA 2014 Kaleidoscope Collection ¨CStripe Twist Bandeau Top with Removable Halter Strap Style:Bikini /2 Pcs with Free
9

RELLECIGA 2014 Kaleidoscope Collection ¨CStripe Twist Bandeau Top with Removable Halter Strap Style:Bikini /2 Pcs with Free Waterproof Bag Size:S, M, L Features: -80% polyamide and 20% spandex Advantages in craft: -Highly flexible swimwear fabric without shirring -Soft natural cotton lining -Comfortable without any irritation -Fine sewing craft

2016
in sports & recreation
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Eternities Men's 3 Pack Thermal Thick Knitting Winter Fall Wool Crew Socks Are you looking for great quality winter socks that keep you warm and comfort in autumn and winter? Eternities Men's 3 Pack
1
$13.99 USD

Are you looking for great quality winter socks that keep you warm and comfort in autumn and winter? Eternities Men's 3 Pack Thermal Thick Knitting Winter Fall Wool Crew Socks - Your best friend in the winter! About Eternities Winter Socks Features: - Fabric: Wool 61%, Nylon 21%, Polyester 13%, Spandex 7%, Comfort and soft! - Nice and stretchy, adjust halter, bow straps, softly warm up you feet in autumn and cold winter everyday wear. Size Chart: - One size fits most. Free size 24.5 to 29.5cm, is suitable for men US size 6 to 12. Package Include: - Three (3) Pairs in one pack, mixed colors as showed: include black, dark grey, light grey or navy colors. - Fabulous gift idea for your family and friends for Fall and Winter: Christmas, Hallowma, Thanksgiving Day, etc. Care Tips: - Do Not Bleach and Do not iron to extend the life of your socks exponentially,soft and comfortable. - Machine Washable (suggest using wash bag). But Best by hand washing with clean water with ordinary temperatures. Note Please: - Adopt high quality warm wool material, so please allow slight drop wool. - Photos are taken under bright sunlight, colors may look darker indoors. - Because of the different measurement methods, pls allow 0-1/2inch difference due to manual measurement. About Eternities: We promise offer good quality products to make sure you satisfied, and try our best to let you have a good shopping experience. You could contact our customer service via Email in advance of claim on Amazon when there any questions. If you're not satisfied with this product for any reason, let us know and we will offer you refund meaning you never need to worry. Let’s go, choose your favorite variety pack and order the Eternities Men's Winter Wool Socks now!

2017
in clothing & accessories
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COCOSHIP Retro 50s Black Pink Blue Floral Halter High Waist Bikini Carnival Swimsuit(FBA)
10
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Ozeri Swiss Designed FRESHSPIN Salad Spinner and Serving Bowl, BPA-Free Designed in Switzerland and boasting frictionless spin action, the effortless BPA-free Ozeri FRESHSPIN Salad Spinner delivers
3
$24.44 USD

Designed in Switzerland and boasting frictionless spin action, the effortless BPA-free Ozeri FRESHSPIN Salad Spinner delivers unparalleled performance and ease-of-use. The Ozeri FRESHSPIN Salad Spinner's features a large 4.2 qtr./4 L colander that accommodates all your greens and herbs. The 5.5 qtr./5.2 L bowl doubles as an elegant serving dish. Perhaps the easiest salad spinner ever made, the Ozeri Salad Spinner requires no more than 2 or 3 pumps to reach its max spin velocity without the disruptive noise common among other spinners. Simply push once on the large brake button to instantly halt the spinning and remove the colander. The colander and bowl can be used separately and are both dishwasher-safe. The Ozeri FRESHSPIN Salad Spinner's handle locks into place for quick storage.

2016
in pantry, household & pets
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Dredd High octane sci-fi action movie with all-out, guns-blazing, bone-crushing, explosives-laden action. Based on the popular comic
5
$10.78 USD
Dredd

High octane sci-fi action movie with all-out, guns-blazing, bone-crushing, explosives-laden action. Based on the popular comic book character JUDGE DREDD. The future America is an irradiated wasteland. On its East Coast lies Mega City One - a vast violent metropolis where criminals rule the chaotic streets. The only force of order lies with the urban cops called "Judges" who possess the combined powers of judge jury and instant executioner. The ultimate Judge Dredd (Karl Urban) is tasked with ridding the city of its latest scourge -a dangerous drug and the sadistic prostitute turned drug pusher who is using it to take over the city. Though few moviegoers queued up to see it, Pete Travis's Dredd is, like its titular hero, a tough, effective piece of action machinery with a single purpose: to fill the screen with as much eye-popping visual mayhem as possible. Based on the iconic British comic series Judge Dredd, which was previously adapted as the 1995 Sylvester Stallone vehicle of the same name, Dredd hews closer to its source material in its depiction of a postapocalyptic world reduced to anarchy and the police force known as the Judges, who try, convict, and execute criminals in one fell swoop. Karl Urban (Star Trek, The Lord of the Rings) is terrifically effective as Dredd, a monosyllabic force of nature dispatched to halt the manufacture of an addictive and disorienting narcotic called "Slo-Mo" by the vicious drug lord Ma-Ma (Lena Headey). With judge-in-training Anderson (Olivia Thirlby) in tow, Dredd works his way up Ma-Ma's 200-story tower stronghold, facing off against her minions as well as corrupt Judges in a barrage of elaborately violent action set pieces. Much of what sets Dredd apart from other comic book and science fiction-action features--the obsessive, brutal focus of its protagonist and the relentlessly bleak environment of the film's setting, Mega City-One--may also be off-putting for viewers who appreciate some grey areas or levity in their entertainment (though that's not to say that Dredd doesn't have its own flinty sense of humor). But Travis's approach should appeal to both fans of the original comic as well as those who favor a vision of the future on the darkly dystopian side, à la Paul Verhoeven's RoboCop and John Carpenter's Escape from New York. Karl Urban acquits himself well to Dredd's steely single-mindedness, expressing an unyielding sense of righteousness in a helmet that obscures nearly all of his features; Thirlby and Headey are also fine as strong, forthright female characters on either side of Dredd's moral compass. The single-disc Blu-ray includes both the standard and 3-D versions of the film, with the latter option avoiding some of the vertigo-inducing effects of digital 3-D while also offering the best showcase for the extraordinary "Slo Mo" sequences. Extras include a solid, introductory featurette on the history of the Dredd character via interviews with, among others, its creators John Wagner and Carlos Ezquerra, and an overview of the picture's visual effects and 3-D process with cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle. A brief motion comic outlines the back story for Ma-Ma, while the remainder of the supplements are devoted to electronic press kit coverage of the set design and Dredd's array of equipment, among others. A digital copy and UltraViolet stream/download round out the disc. --Paul Gaita

2016
in movies, music & books
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Nsstar Invisible Bras Push Up Self Adhesive Strapless Bra Silicone Free Bra C Size:CUP C Description Self-adhesive bra cups, not easy to fall off, freely Caucasian flesh tone is natural-looking and almost
6
$10.99 USD

Size:CUP C Description Self-adhesive bra cups, not easy to fall off, freely Caucasian flesh tone is natural-looking and almost invisible through sheer clothing Silicone padding enhances the size and shape of your chest to give you your desired bust With reality and soft feeling Uplift breasts, enhance cleavage,twice thicken Invisible, perfect to be worn under backless, halter or evening dresses Size Information: A cup: (normal bra size A65; 70; 75; 80; B65; for A cup) B cup: (normal bra size B70; 75; 80; C65; for B cup) C cup: (normal bra size C70; 75; 80; D65; for C cup D cup: (normal bra size D70; 75; 80; 85; F65; for D Package Contents: 1 x Silicone Push-Up Bra NSSTAR(TM) is a US registered trademark,We didn't authorize any other seller to sell our products,if there is someone sell our products illegally,we will reserves the right to be investigated for responsibility.We highly appriciate all customers' opinions to improve our selling ,also if anything you unsatisfied, pls contact our customer service department for probable best solution.

2016
in clothing & accessories
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Nsstar Invisible Bras Push Up Self Adhesive Strapless Bra Silicone Free Bra B Size:CUP B Description Self-adhesive bra cups, not easy to fall off, freely Caucasian flesh tone is natural-looking and almost
4
$10.99 USD

Size:CUP B Description Self-adhesive bra cups, not easy to fall off, freely Caucasian flesh tone is natural-looking and almost invisible through sheer clothing Silicone padding enhances the size and shape of your chest to give you your desired bust With reality and soft feeling Uplift breasts, enhance cleavage,twice thicken Invisible, perfect to be worn under backless, halter or evening dresses Size Information: A cup: (normal bra size A65; 70; 75; 80; B65; for A cup) B cup: (normal bra size B70; 75; 80; C65; for B cup) C cup: (normal bra size C70; 75; 80; D65; for C cup D cup: (normal bra size D70; 75; 80; 85; F65; for D Package Contents: 1 x Silicone Push-Up Bra NSSTAR(TM) is a US registered trademark,We didn't authorize any other seller to sell our products,if there is someone sell our products illegally,we will reserves the right to be investigated for responsibility.We highly appriciate all customers' opinions to improve our selling ,also if anything you unsatisfied, pls contact our customer service department for probable best solution.

2016
in clothing & accessories
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Sakkas Jia Stonewashed Embroidered Handkerchief Hem Halter Dress With Beads This dress short to mid-length with an adjustable waist and neck. The neck closes using the straps to tie around and over the
9
$29.99 USD

This dress short to mid-length with an adjustable waist and neck. The neck closes using the straps to tie around and over the back of the neck. The neck straps have beds that fall elegantly down the strap and help to keep the straps held down at the back of the dress. This dress is made of a lightweight material in our popular stonewashed shades. Each dress is handmade and handdyed for a unique color and cut. This dress is soft and comfortable. The material is opaque, and drapes effortlessly. You can wear this dress alone or style with a pair of tights or leggings. For a unique look try wearing with ombre tights and pair with open toed sandals or with flats. For cooler weather you can easily layer with a cardigan and coat. In warmer weather, you can throw this on alone or as a coverup over your beachwear for a modern twist! Hand wash separately in cold water. Line dry. Imported, | Material: 65% Cotton, 35% Rayon. About Sakkas Store: Sakkas offers trendy designer inspired fashion at deep discounts! We work day and night to bring you high quality clothing and accessories for a fraction of the price you pay at department stores.Our incredible deals sell fast, so don't wait!

2016
in clothing & accessories
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Lucky Day Pets - Pet LED Dog Leash - Waterproof Nylon Webbing with Reflective Strips, 4 Feet Long, Green Color:Green The LED Dog Leash From Lucky Day Pets Will Keep You And Your Dog Safe When Walking At Night Are you worried about
10
$11.99 USD

Color:Green The LED Dog Leash From Lucky Day Pets Will Keep You And Your Dog Safe When Walking At Night Are you worried about your dog's safety when you're walking him at night (or in the morning before it's light)? If so, then worry no more - because our LED dog leash will make sure car drivers can see you in plenty of time. Visible Up To A Quarter Of A Mile (0.4 km) Away Even though the unit is small enough to be built into the leash, it's extremely bright. And at the click of a button, you can quickly choose from three modes: Slow Flash, Fast Flash, and Steady Light. Reflective Strips Too Because we care about your and your doggie's safety, we've also added reflective material to our leash too - increasing your visibility even more. Ideal For Most Dogs Our illuminated leash is rated for all dogs up to 90 lbs (40.8 kg) in weight, regardless of gender or breed. Durable It's made from tough nylon webbing, and the reflective strips are securely stitched on. The metal D clip attaches to almost any collar, harness, or halter in seconds, and can be removed just as quickly and easily. Suitable For Domestic And Professional Use Whether you're a dog trainer, dog walker, or simply a dog lover, this leash will clearly demonstrate that you care for animals. Long-Lasting Batteries Included Unlike many products, the 2 CR2016 Lithium-Ion batteries (which are easy to find when it comes time to replace them) are already fitted inside the light unit when you receive it, so it's ready to go immediately. Waterproof And Washable We're sorry, but you'll have no more excuses if it's raining because this leash is waterproof - and it's also easy to wash should it get dirty. Get Your Lucky Day Pets LED Dog Leash Today And Keep Your Furry Friend Safe When Walking At Night If you care about your Dog's safety please CLICK the "Add to Cart" button and order now!

2016
in pantry, household & pets
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What I Told My Daughter: Lessons from Leaders on Raising the Next Generation of Empowered Women About the Author Nina Tassler was the chairman of CBS Entertainment and has nurtured some of the most popular shows in
11
$16.46 USD

About the Author Nina Tassler was the chairman of CBS Entertainment and has nurtured some of the most popular shows in television, including The Big Bang Theory, How I Met Your Mother, ER, and the critically acclaimed The Good Wife. She also helped shepherd the global phenomena CSI and NCIS to the screen. Tassler serves on the board for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation and is a member of the Board of Trustees for Boston University. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two children. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. What I Told My Daughter Preface I was forty when my daughter was born. After nine months, sixty pounds, and enough water retained to fill the Los Angeles reservoir I gave birth via emergency C-section to a ball of fire. This was not entirely surprising given the journey my husband, Jerry Levine, and I took to meet her. I had gone through a festive assortment of fertility treatments ranging from the requisite menu of drugs and procedures to an experimental medical procedure that occurred entirely by accident; Dr. Richard Paulson flooded my uterus with my husband’s sperm when one of my fertilized eggs decided to make a run for it while going through egg implantation. This was the second time I had gone through an in vitro experiment (I would remind myself periodically that I was still a lab rat). Lots of needles, lots of doctor appointments, all while climbing the high peak of Mt. Anxiety—and then seven to ten days later I got the thrill of taking a pregnancy test. Talk about torture. The wait for the results, the fantasy that I am, in the very moment I am about to take the call from the doctor, in fact, pregnant. How could he possibly give me bad news? Not going to happen, no way. I wasn’t quite sure how to process the information the nurse was giving me over the phone—she reported numbers and levels and hormones. “Am I pregnant?” I asked. Politely, the nurse replied, “Probably not at these levels.” “What level do I need to hit, just give me a number, and I’ll hit it, I’m very goal oriented,” I said in my intense, type-A network executive voice. What a ridiculous thing to say—borderline crazy, I realize as soon as the words leave my mouth. The disappointment made my skin feel thick. The following week Dr. Paulson, the kind, patient Lord of Fertility Manor, called me at home to see how I was feeling, physically and emotionally. I remember getting out of bed to answer the phone. He told me to take a break from the shots. Take a breather. Don’t think about conception, return to sex without an agenda. Just relax. Okay. I hung up the phone and started to cry. Two months later I was pregnant. Regular old sex. I think there were some survivors from the sperm invasion waiting for the perfect egg. They found her. Or rather she grabbed one by the scruff of his collar and commanded, “You!” as if she were Diana, the huntress of Roman mythology. Our daughter was setting the stage for her arrival into the world from, literally, Day One. She dictated the terms of her insemination, and she was going to orchestrate every detail, from the pounds I gained during pregnancy to the trauma she and I went through after an induced labor resulting in a horrific emergency cesarean delivery. A decade and a half later, I am just beginning to understand the significance of my daughter’s creation and birth. We named her Alice Luisa after both of her great-grandmothers. Each of those women were heroes in their own right—the eldest children in both of their families, immigrants who came to the United States with little but grew up to be formidable women. We chose the name not just because Jewish tradition says naming your child for a deceased loved one allows their memory to be kept alive, but because Jerry and I hoped all the traits we admired in our grandmothers would be passed down to our daughter. It was a thoughtful and significant decision. From the day she was born, I was committed to raising Alice as a feminist, just as I was by my mother. To me, that means understanding that women are in every respect the equals of men and should never in any circumstance be considered otherwise. I made a point of instilling these principles in my son, Matthew, when he was little. One morning on our drive to school he declared, “You know, Mom, boys are better than girls.” I pulled the car over, turned off the engine, and made sure he saw the look on my face. “No, Matthew,” I told him, “boys and girls are different but they are equal.” This is an exchange that my son remembers to this day. That deep-in-the-bones understanding of equality comes with the acknowledgment that we live in a patriarchal society that imposes gender distinctions in so many ways—from the toys we play with as toddlers to the careers we pursue to the roles we carve out in our own family structures. As women, we have a responsibility to combat such prejudice with our words and deeds, sometimes with our feet, and with fists clenched in solidarity. We don’t need to demand equality so much as we need to live and breathe it in everything we do. It is an extra burden, one that women have shouldered since time immemorial. At the core of what makes us women, the objectification of female sexuality has a profound influence on our psyches from our earliest days. In today’s hyperactive media landscape, we are buffeted by an endless stream of messages to be prettier, thinner, sexier, lustier, happier, smarter but not too threatening. Ask any mother—you never feel the outrage about our cultural obsession with false ideals of beauty until you’ve seen it through the questioning eyes of your baby girl. As my daughter reached her preteen years, I began a quest to hone my personal definition of feminism and learn how other women defined their strength. I read all the books and research I could find, but nothing quite answered the questions I had about the unique intimacy that exists between a mother and daughter. I wanted to know how other women communicated with their daughters, how they instilled in them the values and principles that matter most. I wanted to hear the humor, sense the subtext, and savor the lyrical language used in telling each story—women who are all so different from one another, and different from their mothers. I realized that if I was searching for advice and inspiration on ways to teach girls to feel empowered, other moms probably were too. My instincts told me to reach out to women who are in leadership roles in a variety of disciplines, from Oscar- and Emmy-winning actresses to pioneering doctors and scientists to spiritual leaders, activists, politicians, academicians, writers, directors, business executives, and those who do heroic work with nonprofit and philanthropic organizations. I was overwhelmed by how quickly so many embraced the “What I Told My Daughter” concept. On the journey of assembling this book, I came to understand that raising a daughter with feminist ideals is as much of a parental responsibility as it is to ensure that she eats a well-balanced diet and gets plenty of sleep. I remember the days when Alice was in preschool, and I would pack her backpack in the morning with snacks, water, hand wipes, and other items to get her through the day. I believe as mothers we need to pack our daughters’ backpacks with the supplies necessary to be a strong, determined proponent of gender equality. We can’t assume that she’ll absorb these principles automatically, no matter how many wonderful role models she has in her life. We have to work at teaching those lessons. My point of view on what it means to be an empowered woman came directly from my mother, Norma. She sang to me lullabies of freedom, celebrating our right to full equality with men within the broader context of the civil rights and antiwar movements of the 1960s. She instilled in me the fundamental belief that I was destined for some variation on greatness—and it was those ideals that gave me the underlying confidence and determination to pursue a career that has taken me to the top echelon of the entertainment business. My mother gave me the gift of never doubting that I would achieve my goals. I was a young girl when the Vietnam War was at its height. I grew up in a small town in upstate New York, West Copake, where many local boys had been drafted and were serving overseas. In the center of the town there was a large clock on a pedestal commemorating the men and women who served in World War II. The general feeling among the people in my town was to support the war—that’s just what you did. It was almost unheard-of for people to protest our government’s actions or express antiwar sentiments. So when I stood on crisp autumn nights by the base of that clock among a small group of concerned locals with a candle in one hand and my mother’s in the other, I was afraid. The setting itself was unnerving to a kid. It was dark. People were singing emotional antiwar songs; I was one of a few children surrounded by adults. I would sing softly as I knew all the words to “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “Universal Soldier.” But I felt alone, and I knew discussing the evening’s activities the next day at school would not help my popularity. But as time went by, I grew less fearful. The strangeness I felt was replaced by the familiar and the conviction that I was doing something important. Perhaps I was getting comfortable with the sound of my own voice, or feeling that I was going to be part of a bigger story by helping to bring an end to a war a half a world away that was killing people from my town. Or maybe I grew more confident because my mother was beside me. It was as if she sent me secret signals through her firm grip of my hand. The message received was: “It’s okay to stand alone, to be afraid, to hold unpopular beliefs, to hear the sound of your own voice and to let courage grow from within?” These are the lessons my mother taught me with her words and with her inspiring example. Now with my own daughter I search for similar opportunities. Some days it feels more difficult as the fast pace and congestion of our daily lives seems to make it hard to even breathe. But the experiences that help us raise strong, confident daughters are found everywhere, often when we least expect it. Reading these stories from an eminent group of women is a way to preserve and to share our collective wisdom with women around the world, for years to come. The spark of inspiration for this book came to me at a most unexpected time and place: the Phoenix Convention Center, where I watched Alice, then thirteen, take part in a volleyball tournament that draws hundreds of young female players from all over the world. I was struck at first by the sheer number of women gathered in one place for the purpose of demonstrating their athletic skills and all the leadership and character traits that come with team sports. This event, featuring players ranging in age from twelve to eighteen, was all about achievement, about striving to perform at the highest levels as individuals and as a collective unit. It was also an assault on the senses, what with the oppressive June heat (it was 115 degrees outside, literally), and the roar of the screeching, cheering, and ball-smacking sounds coming from row after row of volleyball courts erected in the cavernous space. I’d never been in such a female-centric environment before. The energy radiating from the assembly of young girls and their mothers was electrifying. As I looked around, I saw a panorama of womanhood, in all shapes and sizes, from preteen middle schoolers to young women about to head off to college to all the mothers who guided them to this moment. I recognized that while we all had much in common, every mother and every daughter traveled their own path to get to this moment. I didn’t know it at the time, but that’s when I made up my mind to shepherd this book of deeply personal essays. As someone who has built a career on developing great storytellers, I believe every woman has an experience that can inspire and enlighten others. At the volleyball tournament, my daughter’s team didn’t win their final match. But Alice played hard and was there for her teammates at pivotal points in the game. When I told her I was most impressed by how “consistent” her performance was, it was as if I had a magic key and unlocked a secret door, because I had given her an honest reflection that validated her own feelings. It wasn’t just a platitude. I felt how much it meant to her that I’d noticed her contributions to the game. In that moment, I could feel that my role in her life was shifting. We had turned a corner. We were starting to communicate on a more adult level than we ever had before. Alice was of the age where she no longer needed me to be there with Band-Aids when she scraped her knee; she needed me to be there with honest emotional support as she began to tackle adult-size challenges and opportunities. I was immensely proud of her for working so hard all season toward her goal, and I thought about all the ways I’d tried to instill that kind of drive and confidence in her. The importance of heroes and role models was underscored during the tournament when the girls were addressed by volleyball star Misty May-Treanor. This was an inspiring moment, because May-Treanor is a rock star to these girls and her motivational words had great resonance. She was two months away from winning her third Olympic-career gold medal, this time at the 2012 summer games in London. Weeks after the volleyball tournament, I was still so energized by the experience that I knew I had to make this book happen. I am deeply grateful to the busy women who took time out to contribute their stories. In the spirit of reaching out and giving back, a portion of the proceeds from this book will be donated to two organizations devoted to nurturing leadership skills in young women: Girls Inc. and the United Nations Foundation’s Girl Up campaign. Working on this book has been nothing less than a revelation for me. I never fully appreciated the strength of the emotional and intellectual foundation provided by my mother’s teachings until the essays collected here gave me insights into the challenges that others have faced. Our contributors reflect the breadth of maternal experiences and the melting pot of racial, ethnic, sexual orientation, education, income levels, and cultural differences that define our country. The order of presentation in this book seeks to both accentuate that diversity and reinforce the universality of motherhood. Underneath the divisive labels that are often affixed to our jobs—working mom, tiger mom, helicopter mom, soccer mom, et cetera—we are all simply women trying to do our best to raise the next generation of empowered leaders. In a few instances, we offer the dual perspective of essays from mothers and their daughters. Pat Benatar writes about being under enormous pressure from her record label to hide her pregnancy when she was topping the charts in the 1980s. Jehan Sadat, widow of Egyptian leader Anwar Sadat, recalls the extra hurdles she scaled to earn her doctorate degree in the face of accusations of favoritism from university officials. Dr. Susan Love, the eminent breast cancer expert, recounts the legal battle she waged with her wife, Helen Cooksey, to adopt their daughter, Katie. Dolores Huerta, cofounder of the United Farm Workers union with Cesar Chavez, tells the story of leading a labor movement while scrambling every day to find child care for her own children. Other contributors offer stories of mother-daughter experiences that range from funny to heartbreaking to uplifting. Marie Osmond reveals how she and her daughter wound up breaking off engagements virtually on the eve of walking down the aisle. Author Ayelet Waldman tells how “Be nice to the fat girls” became a family motto. Actress Christine Baranski describes how a muddy fall from a horse taught her daughter an important lesson. Brooke Shields writes candidly about how she turned scary encounters with paparazzi into a teachable moment for her girls. The common thread in all of these tales is the extra layer of responsibility that mothers have to guide their daughters to be empowered, to be confident, and to make the right choices for them regardless of societal pressures. From the time I was a girl, I never doubted that I had every right—dare I say even a sense of entitlement—to pursue the career of my dreams. It started with acting, which was an uphill battle for me no matter how much I loved the idea of being an actor. After a period of trial and error in my twenties, I found my natural strength as a program development executive, someone who works with writers, directors, and actors to help shape raw ideas and talent into prime-time TV series. Contrary to our public image, network “suits” aren’t all meddling incompetents who do nothing but deliver nonsensical notes to writers. Television is an extremely tough business—the failure rate of new shows is higher than 80 percent for most TV networks. But when it works, nothing in entertainment packs more of a punch than a hit television series. These are the storytellers and the characters that Americans welcome into their living rooms (and nowadays their smartphones and tablets) week after week. I’ve been fortunate in my career to have been involved with some of the biggest TV hits of the past few decades—from the dedicated doctors of ER to the forensic sleuths of CSI and its offshoots to the lovable geeks of The Big Bang Theory, among many other shows. I have been lucky to have been mentored by great bosses, male and female, and to have worked for progressive companies, notably Warner Bros., which has long reigned as the largest studio in Hollywood, and CBS, the “Tiffany Network.” I am indebted to many predecessors in the entertainment industry who blazed the trails that allowed women to reach the highest ranks at networks and studios. In 2004, I took over the job of overseeing programming for CBS from the woman who previously held that position, Nancy Tellem, an accomplished executive who is one of the most respected strategic thinkers in all of media. For more than twenty-five years, at CBS, Warner Bros., and Lorimar Productions, I had the privilege of working for an enlightened leader, CBS Corporation chairman, president, and CEO Leslie Moonves. Leslie and I enjoyed a longevity that is rare in the entertainment industry. We thrived together on the strength of a relationship built on trust, respect, and support, whether in success or failure. Finally, Leslie granted me the ultimate gift of controlling my own destiny as an executive. After much consideration, I made the decision to resign my post as chairman of CBS Entertainment in December 2015, just as we finished up work on this book. As much as I have loved working with writers, actors, directors, producers, and others in the creative community, assembling What I Told My Daughter helped me realize that it was time to seek new challenges and flex new muscles. Through all my years in television, I have rarely felt disadvantaged because I’m a woman. Developing shows that appeal to a wide audience by definition means finding shows that connect with female viewers, because women make up a little more than half of the total viewing audience in the United States. Having a built-in sense of what distinct groups of women might respond to when they turn on the tube is only a plus in my business. But like women in many lines of work, I have often walked into high-level meetings where I was the only female in the room. I’ve experienced the aggravation of being talked over by voices deeper than mine. I’ve had the demeaning experience of making a presentation or advocating a position only to have questions and comments directed to a male coworker. I stand about five foot two in low heels, which means that I sometimes have to work harder to exert my authority with unfamiliar people. Nowadays the stature I gained through my position at CBS mostly combats the problem of those who think, even subconsciously, that short equals weak. But some people still blurt out, “You’re so tiny” or “You’re not as tall as I thought you were,” when I first meet them. Dealing with this perception issue has made me more sensitive to how women are perceived and portrayed in our culture. My definition of what it meant to be a strong woman was shaped by my mother and her history. I defined myself as a feminist because she was the role model who drove me to pursue the career of my choice, and to speak out if I ever felt cheated or judged unfairly. Now that my daughter is of the age where she’s facing important decisions about her future, the question of what it means to be a feminist in the twenty-first century—more than fifty years after The Feminine Mystique—has come into sharp focus. Even from the time I started working on this book, the cultural debate about the definition of feminism has heated up on op-ed pages, in academia, and in pop culture. For female celebrities, the question “Are you a feminist?” has become a “gotcha” moment in media interviews. It’s disconcerting to see prominent stars disavow the F-word because they associate it with disliking men and all the other negative connotations heaped on the term by those who fear true gender equality. Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, helped spark this conversation with her powerful message about the importance of encouraging women to step up as leaders in her 2013 book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead. Since then a number of commentators have weighed in with articles and essays attempting to answer some of my questions: Why does it seem that the modern women’s movement has stalled? What do we need to do—what should we do—to revive a spirit of activism and advocacy without excuses, without apologies or without qualifications? It was invigorating to see no less a superstar than Beyoncé taking a stand on the F-word and send a powerful message to young people by performing at MTV’s 2014 Video Music Awards against a backdrop of “FEMINIST” in giant block letters. Actress Emma Watson made headlines—and drew a standing ovation—with her impassioned and articulate twelve-minute speech declaring herself a feminist at the United Nations in September 2014. She spoke in her capacity as a UN Women Goodwill Ambassador and unveiled the launch of the HeForShe campaign to enlist men and boys to work toward ending gender inequality in all its forms. “The more I’ve spoken about feminism, the more I have realized that fighting for women’s rights has too often become synonymous with man-hating,” Watson said. “If there is one thing I know for certain it is that this has to stop.” After all the gains of the past hundred years, how can we possibly still live in a world where women still account for less than 5 percent of the CEO posts in Fortune 500 companies? How is it possible that a national retailer could market a T-shirt for girls that proclaimed: “I’m too pretty to do my math homework so my brother has to do it for me”? Somebody at JCPenney thought that was a good idea. In 2011. Oscar-winning actress Geena Davis, a friend of mine from our college days at Boston University, was so dismayed at the portrayals of female characters in children’s media after she had her daughter that she launched the Institute on Gender in Media. She funded it out of her own pocket at the start in an effort to generate credible academic research on how gender images in media affect all of our children. One of the most surprising facts uncovered by the research her institute has funded is the documentation that male characters outnumber females three-to-one in family- and kid-friendly films—a ratio that hasn’t changed since the 1940s. Geena writes with humor in her essay for this collection about the experiences with her daughter, Alizeh, that led her to establish the institute and its advocacy arm, See Jane. My own principles of striving to be open-minded and respectful of individual choice have been tested by the growth in the number of highly educated, highly skilled women who “opt out” of the labor force to focus on raising children. Some have argued that this is a new form of feminism—the ability to disengage from working outside the home if that’s where your passion lies. The renewed scrutiny of the social status of women sparked by Lean In has shed light on the reality that while we may have lost the sense of being part of a broad-based national “movement” to press for equal rights, there are many more platforms out there for women to make their voices heard—no matter what they choose to express. Unfortunately, the increasing tendency by the media to divide mothers into categories has a negative effect in making both women and men more judgmental of the parenting and lifestyle choices that we make. Why can’t we all just be moms? It’s easy to get discouraged—until you see people like Ms. Watson claiming the mantle for the next generation. The movement is there, but it’s more diffuse and diverse than in the early days of Ms. Magazine. It’s analogous to the fundamental changes I’ve seen across the television business, which has evolved from a marketplace dominated by three networks (CBS, NBC, and ABC) to a universe of 200-plus channels and a multitude of screens in the typical American home. Ideas of what it means to be a feminist are as plentiful as new television shows these days. I embrace the diversity of this modern patchwork quilt. We have come a long way but we have miles to go. The mothering instinct makes us want to equip our daughters and our sons with everything they need to be happy, healthy, successful, and fulfilled. In The Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan famously asserted that “the personal is political” for women in defining who they are and what they are able to achieve. It doesn’t get any more personal than the shared experiences of mothers and daughters. In these pages I hope readers will find inspiration, insights, and ideas for the most meaningful ways to impart the values and the beliefs that we prize the most as modern mothers. It’s never too early, or too late, to start packing that backpack. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

2016
in movies, music & books
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FOSHAN MINGZE Digital IR Infrared Thermometer,Non-contact LCD Instant Read Thermometer Laser Temperature Gun - -50 ~ 380℃(-58 ~ 716℉) Handheld,Auto Power Off/Backlight ON/OFF FOSHAN MINGZE Digital IR Infrared Thermometer ,Instant Read Thermometer ,Digital Thermometer Auto Power Off/Backlight ON/OFF
7
$34.39 USD

FOSHAN MINGZE Digital IR Infrared Thermometer ,Instant Read Thermometer ,Digital Thermometer Auto Power Off/Backlight ON/OFF FOSHAN MINGZE infrared thermometer is used for measuring the temperature of the object’s surface, which is applicable for various hot, hard-to-reach objects without contact safely and quickly ,suitable for the temperature measuring and monitoring of hot water pipes, hot engine parts, cooking surfaces, hot tubes insulation, wine coolers hot asphalt, swimming pools, air conditioning refrigeration and heating.. The instant read thermometer consist of Optics, Temperature Sensor Signal amplifier, Processing circuit and LCD Display. Specification: Temperature range:-50 ~ 380℃(-58 ~ 716℉) Accuracy:±1.5℃/±1.5% Resolution:0.1℃ or 0.1℉ Repeatability: 1% of reading or 1℃ Response time:500 mSec,95% response Spectral response: 8-14um Emissivity: 0.95 Preset Distance to Spot size: 12:1 Operating temperature: 0 ~ 40℃(32 ~ 104℉) Operating Humidity: 10~90%RH non-condensing, up to 30℃(86℉) Storage temperature: -20 ~ 60℃(-4 ~ 140℉) Power:2*1.5 AAA battery (Not Included) Warm Prompt: 1. Please don't point laser directly at eye or indirectly off reflective surfaces, don't use it in the environment of explosive gas, steam or dusty, avoid causing harm or damage to human body. 2. Don't leave the unit on or near objects of high temperature to avoid the damage of the unit or target. Package: 1 x FOSHAN MINGZE Infrared Digital Thermometer 1 x English Manual

2016
in home improvement & tools
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The White Shadow - Season 1 A timeless classic that fans are clamoring for! From the Creators of "COACH CARTER," "ST. ELSEWHERE,"
6
$9.06 USD

A timeless classic that fans are clamoring for! From the Creators of "COACH CARTER," "ST. ELSEWHERE," "NORTHERN EXPOSURE" AND "NYPD BLUE." When professional basketball player Ken Reeves (Ken Howard) suffers a serious knee injury, his career comes to a grinding haltand all his dreams of glory seem shattered. Fortunately an old friend, who is now the principal of a Los Angeles inner-city high school, offers him a job as a basketball coach. Although initially hesitant, Reeves' love of the game finally convinces him to accept the position. But he soon discovers the only thing worse than his team's lack of skill on the court is their lack of belief in themselves off the court. Yet the new coach feels certain that the right combination of guts, sweat, luck and attention will make his players winners in the end. The entertaining and sometimes powerful The White Shadow gets under one's skin very quickly. Ken Howard plays former NBA star Ken Reeves, whose career in the pro game is cut short by serious injuries. Along comes Ken's old college roomate, Jim Willis (Jason Bernard in the pilot episode, Ed Bernard after that), principal of an inner-city high school in Los Angeles with a high dropout rate and plenty of antagonism between thuggish students and an angry faculty. Jim makes Ken an offer any sensible man might refuse, but somehow Ken can't: becoming coach of the school's low-achieving basketball team. Hardly a bleeding heart and prone to inopportune wisecracks, Ken nevertheless gets the team on its feet and slowly takes cautious interest in the personal lives of individual players. Over the course of 15 first-season episodes, Ken gets in the middle of his students' problems, including alcoholism, gang affiliations, early fatherhood, racism, and fighting. Ken is not without his own issues and biases, which have to be faced at critical times. In "Just One of the Boys," the addition of a new player, who might be gay, to the team makes him terribly anxious--and embarrassed that he feels that way. "Spare the Rod" finds Ken at his lowest moment after striking a student who punched him in the nose. What makes this story interesting is that every adult in the school rushes to Ken's defense, even praises him for taking a stand. Yet the attention deepens his shame, and makes Ken too ready to forgive his dangerous attacker. Actress Joan Pringle is excellent as vice-principal Sybil Buchanan, Ken's ally-adversary. Be on the lookout for a number of actors who would soon have starring roles on 1980s TV series, among them Michael Warren and Bruce Weitz (Hill Street Blues), Peter Horton (thirtysomething), and Jonathan Frakes (Star Trek: The Next Generation). --Tom Keogh

2016
in art & collectibles
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